Aug
07

Having passed the CCIE Voice 10 years ago, and having taught on the technologies surrounding both Voice and Collaboration ever since, one might think that the exam would be easy to pass. I can assure you that no matter how much you know, no CCIE exam is easy to pass. Cisco doesn’t allow them to be. Every CCIE track requires hard work and preparation, even if it may, at first glance, seem somewhat of a repeat of things you already know. You may ask since I had the CCIE Voice already, why I didn’t simply take the Collaboration Written exam and convert my cert to a CCIE Collaboration? The answer I think is pretty straightforward – it’s the challenge!! Seeing if you still have it 10 years later. Seeing if what you’ve been teaching your students for 10 years is still up to par and still relevant. To take you back to when I passed CCIE Voice ten years ago, the track was literally brand new that year, and Cisco was testing on CallManager version 3.3, SIP wasn’t anywhere to be found, and creating a hunt group meant tweaking Attendant Console to make it do things it shouldn’t ever be expected to do (like work). I’m quite happy to find that I may still have ‘it’ and that my content is right on par and not only relevant on all accounts, but as always goes well above and beyond the minimum of what you need to know to pass the exam, and takes you into the deep inner-workings of the technologies and answers the all of the “why” questions. Bear in mind that we never create content with the singular goal of simply getting you “past” the lab exam (the people that can only barely pass the lab can’t make it past a technical interview in the real world), but rather our focus is making you a true expert whereby, as a byproduct, you do pass the lab exam and quite handily at that. Over the past 10 years I’ve had the pleasure of helping over 1,500 people do just this, and it’s been so enriching in my life to see their professional and personal lives bettered for it. So what took me so long to getting around to sitting for this new exam? Simply put – my schedule. As some of you may know, I’ve been teaching a lot of 2-week CCIE Data Center courses and 2-week CCIE Collaboration courses, as well as working on building all of the Collaboration racks and self-paced learning content, and quite frankly just hadn’t found time in my schedule to get around to preparing to sit for and take the actual new lab exam until just a few weeks ago. So onto more of what you need to know and what it takes to be ready.

CCIE Numero Quatro

It’s quite possible that I may be one of the only people besides Frog that possesses 3 or more CCIE’s, where one of them is not Routing and Switching.

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Jul
31

Update 1: CCIE Collaboration Racks are now available for rent. Sign in to your members account and click on Rack Rentals in the left navigation. Please note that these racks are currently in general beta release, meaning they are available to everyone, but if you happen to find a bug or an issue with the scheduler, rack control page, or rack equipment, please start a support case and kindly let us know about it so that we may remediate it quickly. We’ve had a number of closed beta testers and their tests have all gone very well. We should be out of general beta release within a few weeks. Full instructions on how to use our racks can be found in our new Collaboration Rack Rental Guide, and I will be releasing a few follow-up videos later today with links inside the guide, to further demo things and walk you through how to use these racks, including the use our new rack control panel.
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Jul
21

The CCIE Routing & Switching Advanced Technologies Class v5 resumes Wednesday, July 23rd at 8:00 AM PDT (15:00 UTC) at live.ine.com, where we will be discussing MPLS Layer 3 VPN. In the meantime, you will find the streaming and download playlists have been updated and now includes over 63 hours of content.

We have some other great news as well. The CCIE R&S v5 Rack Control panel has been released with the built-in telnet, loading and saving configs and one click device configurations and reset requests. Also, new content will be posted this week to the workbook, including all new troubleshooting labs.


Jul
16

INE is reducing the cost of our live, instructor-led bootcamps by $1,000 each. Our new pricing model will still include access to our workbooks and ATC video courses with the purchase , but will separate out the Lab Exam Voucher and access to our All Access Pass as optional add-ons to provide you with a more flexible options for both your learning style and your budget. If you would like the existing complete, bundled solution, you have until Aug 1 to make a bootcamp purchase.

See this advert for more details.

Look forward to seeing you in a bootcamp soon!

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Jul
10

Tomorrow’s CCIE Routing & Switching Advanced Technologies Class v5 is postponed, as baby 3.0’s shipping date has arrived ;)   Class will tentatively return the week of July 21st, however I will post more information and updates about workbook changes before that.

In the meantime the current CCIE RSv5 ATC streaming playlist can be found here, and the download playlist can be found here. Some videos are still in post processing and will be posted within the next few days.

Although we’re only in week 47 of the class (or so it seems), we’ve put a huge dent in the overall topic scope so far.  You can see our current progress in the overall CCIE RSv5 Expanded Blueprint here.  Some of topics that haven’t been covered in the v5 ATC officially yet can be found in the CCIE RSv4 ATC and the RSv4 to RSv5 Transition Technologies addendum at the end of that playlist.

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Jul
08

Tomorrow (2014-07-09) at 08:00 PDT (15:00 UTC) I will be starting our next major section of the CCIE Routing & Switching Version 5 Advanced Technologies Class – MPLS. This class is free to attend for all at http://live.ine.com – simply sign up for a free INE members account here or sign up for a free trial of our All Access Pass - which includes streaming video access to our entire video library – including all of the new CCIE RSv5 ATC videos up to this point.

For me personally when I was first learning MPLS, the biggest hurdle I found was sorting through all the buzzwords and acronyms. For the life of me no matter how many books I read, I couldn’t figure out why MPLS would even be needed in the first place. Tomorrow’s class will cut to the chase, as essentially MPLS 101 for CCIE Candidates.

Specifically I will be first starting with the main MPLS use case, tunneling BGP over the core. Through live examples on the Cisco IOS CLI I will show why MPLS is the preferred transport method for Service Providers that offer both public and private IPv4 & IPv6 transit services, and then expand into further use cases such as Layer 3 VPN and Layer 2 VPN services, and talk about where MPLS is even applicable in the Enterprise.  As always, questions are welcomed and encouraged during the class – the more you put into class ultimately the more you get out of it.

I hope to see you live during class tomorrow at http://live.ine.com!

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Jul
07

Despite Outlook’s reminder to me this morning, CCIE R&S v5 Advanced Technologies Class will continue this morning at http://live.ine.com at 08:00 PDT (15:00 UTC).  ;)

Today’s class continues with advanced BGP design and implementation.  The tentative topic schedule for this week is as following:

  • Advanced BGP
  • IGP and BGP Convergence Optimizations
  • MPLS VPN
  • IPsec VPN

Additionally the vast majority of previous class sessions are now available on the CCIE RSv5 ATC Playlist here.  Specifically the current recordings cover the following:

  • CCIE RSv5 Advanced Technologies Class Introduction
  • CCIE RSv4 to RSv5 Changes
  • CCIE Preparation Resources & Strategy
  • LAN Switching Introduction
  • VLANs & Trunking
  • VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP)
  • VTP Version 3
  • EtherChannel
  • Layer 2 EtherChannel Configuration
  • Layer 3 EtherChannel Configuration
  • Spanning-Tree Protocol
  • Optional Spanning-Tree Features
  • Rapid Spanning-Tree Protocol
  • Multiple Spanning-Tree Protocol
  • WAN Circuits
  • PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE)
  • IPv4 Routing
  • Policy Based Routing
  • IP SLA & Enhanced Object Tracking
  • GRE & IP in IP Tunneling
  • Classic EIGRP
  • EIGRP Named Mode
  • EIGRP Classic Metric Calculation
  • EIGRP Wide Metrics
  • EIGRP Traffic Engineering & Unequal Cost Load Balancing
  • EIGRP Classic Authentication
  • EIGRP Automatic Key Rotation
  • EIGRP Named Mode Authentication
  • EIGRP Summarization
  • EIGRP Traffic Engineering with Summarization
  • EIGRP over DMVPN
  • EIGRP Stub Routing
  • Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Protocol & Operation Overview
  • OSPF Single Area Configuration
  • Troubleshooting OSPF Adjacencies
  • OSPF Areas and LSAs
  • OSPF Media Dependencies & Network Types
  • Configuring OSPF Network Types
  • OSPF Virtual Links
  • OSPF Stub Areas
  • Configuring OSPF Stub Areas
  • Traffic Engineering with OSPF Stub Areas
  • Configuring OSPF Not So Stubby Areas (NSSA)
  • Controlling NSSA Redistribution
  • Default Routing with OSPF NSSA
  • OSPF NSSA Translator Election & Forwarding Address
  • OSPF Path Selection
  • OSPF Authentication
  • OSPF Authentication Enhancements
  • OSPF Summarization Overview
  • Configuring OSPF Summarization
  • Dynamic Multipoint VPN (DMVPN) Overview
  • Basic DMVPN Configuration
  • DMVPN Phase 1,2,& 3
  • DMVPN Phase 1 Configuration
  • Routing protocols over DMVPN Phase 1 :: Part 1
  • Routing protocols over DMVPN Phase 1 :: Part 2
  • DMVPN Phase 2 Configuration
  • Routing protocols over DMVPN Phase 2
  • DMVPN Phase 3 Configuration
  • IPv4 Route Redistribution Overview
  • Basic Redistribution Examples
  • Why Routing Loops Occur
  • Preventing Routing Loops/ Feedback
  • Redistribution Case #1
  • Redistribution Case #2
  • Redistribution Case #3

 

 

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Jun
28

This Friday concludes the 3rd week of INE’s Live CCIE RSv5 Advanced Technologies ClassClass will tentatively continue on Monday June 30th 2014 at 08:00 PDT (15:00 UTC), with advanced BGP  designs and applications.  Tentative class dates for next week beyond this are Tuesday July 1st and Wednesday July 2nd with the same start time of 08:00 PDT.

I list these dates as tentative because they are all dependent on Baby McGahan 3.0, whom is officially due on July 15th.  Essentially as it stands I am on permanent 24/7 on-call rotation for baby to arrive at any second.  E.g. don’t be surprised if I pick up my phone during class, and then immediately walk off camera with no explanation.  Baby 3.0’s arrival is eminent ;)

For those of you that have been attending live, I would like to thank you for your input during class, especially during Q&A sessions; the more you put into class the more you get out. My video team is hard at work on posting these new videos on the RSv5 ATC streaming playlist, and also the downloadable RSv5 ATC videos.  In the meantime, the previous RSv4 ATC playlist can be found here, which covers many of the core topics of RSv5 along with some of the Transition Technologies that I added to the end of the playlist.

Going forward, the following is a list of key *new* features to RSv5 that we have not yet covered (we will be covering them).  However, if you want to do some homework this weekend on any of these new topics, you can find a list of recommended books, documentation, cisco live presentations, etc. below that cover these.  The overall RSv5 ATC outline can be found here as our CCIE RSv5 Expanded Blueprint.

Happy labbing this weekend, I hope to see you all back for Monday’s class!

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Jun
26

In a recent post I talked about Using Config Replace For Managing Router & Switch Initial Configs.  This is a great feature that can be useful to quickly switch between initial configs and a default config while labbing on your routers without having to write erase and reload – which can be very time consuming.  However, I previously assumed that this required a staged “blank” config in the router’s flash, because regular IOS and IOS-XE don’t have a built in text editor such as vi/nano/pico that would let you create a blank file on the router’s flash.

Thanks to my buddy xous in #cisco on irc.freenode.net, I found that you can use TCL to write a file to flash through the IOS CLI, the same as if it was a native text editor.  The end result is that you can use the following code to write a blank config file at any time to rollback to.

tclsh
puts [ open "flash:blank.cfg" w+] {
version 15.4
!
end
}
tclquit

An example implementation of this is as follows:

R1#show ip int brief | exclude unassign
Interface              IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol
GigabitEthernet1.13    155.1.13.1      YES TFTP   up                    up
GigabitEthernet1.100   169.254.100.1   YES TFTP   up                    up
GigabitEthernet1.146   155.1.146.1     YES TFTP   up                    up
Loopback0              150.1.1.1       YES TFTP   up                    up
Tunnel0                155.1.0.1       YES TFTP   up                    up      

R1#tclsh
R1(tcl)#puts [ open "flash:blank.cfg" w+] {
+>(tcl)#version 1.1
+>(tcl)#!
+>(tcl)#end
+>(tcl)#}
R1(tcl)#tclquit
R1#config replace flash:blank.cfg
This will apply all necessary additions and deletions
to replace the current running configuration with the
contents of the specified configuration file, which is
assumed to be a complete configuration, not a partial
configuration. Enter Y if you are sure you want to proceed. ? [no]: yes
Overwriting with a file sized 50% or less than running config's. Proceed? [no]: yes
% Be sure to ask the CA administrator to revoke your certificates.

*snip*

Router#
Router#show ip int brief | ex unassign
Interface              IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol

Router#

The end result is that you can at any time default the router’s config without having to erase and reload. Note that there are certain caveats such as deleted subinterfaces on Ethernet or Serial links which will still exist as “deleted” in the running config, but in most cases for our applications this will not be an issue.

Also as a shameless plug for IRC feel free to join the discussion in the channel #cisco on irc.freenode.net and chat with us. You can find me there with nick bmcgahan.

Happy labbing!

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Jun
24

Update: Redistribution case studies are now available in the workbook starting here.  More will be added to the list before class tomorrow.

If you’re not already an All Access Pass member then you can sign up here for a free trial here.  AAP access includes not only access to the live RSv5 ATC class I’m currently running and the streaming playlist of the RSv5 ATC, but also include streaming access to our entire video library of literally thousands of hours of content – and growing.

The direct URL for live class tomorrow is http://live.ine.com. Remember the big advantage of attending the class live is that you get to ask me questions in real-time.  I hope to see you there!

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