Archive for January, 2009

Jan
31

In this post we will give a brief overview of the upgrade path from CCIE Security v2.0 blueprint to v3.0. First off all, let’s start with the good news to everyone who was preparing using the old blueprint: most of things you have learned are incorporated smoothly in the new blueprint. Basically, the only thing to forget is your VPN3k configuration skills :) Everything else either remains the same or experiences an “incremental update”, like LAN-to-LAN VPNs with IPsec VTI interfaces. Let’s quickly review the changes made to the hardware and how they could potentially affect you.

  • Removal of the PIX and VPN3k devices, which is natural as both are EOL and EOS. Therefore, forget all about VPN3k menu system and enjoy the simpler topology without the PIX ;) However, to some people, getting a PIX is more affordable than getting an ASA. In this case, remember that the latest software release supported by the PIX is 8.0(4) (not the 8.1) and you cannot configure SSL VPN on PIX. Still, you can practice almost 90% of all the firewall features using the PIX.
  • Change from the Catalyst 3550 to 3560 models. From the security features standpoint, nothing has seriously changed. You can even continue using the older 3550 model, as they are probably cheaper to get nowadays.
  • The so much awaited upgrade from IOS 12.2T to IOS 12.4T. First of all, this might require a change in the hardware platforms you are using. If you were using non-ISR or non-2600XM routers, you will need to change the hardware platform to at least 2600XM with full flash/RAM memory (to run the Advanced Security feat. set) or the 1841 ISRs. Note that using Dynamips you can play with all 12.4T features without getting your hands around any real gear. Secondly, 12.4T introduces a ton of new features, as compared to the dusty 12.2T. However, it’s not that scary as it might look like. Most of the new security features relate to IOS PKI, some AAA enhancements, bunch of advanced VPN topics and infrastructure security. Probably, all the most notable features are VPN/Firewall related: IPsec VTI, WebVPN/SSL VPN support in IOS, DMVPN Phase3, GET VPN; Zone-Based and Transparent firewall, CBAC enhancements. Later in this document we will see those features detailed as the upgrade list of the new SC VOL1 labs.
  • ASA software upgrade from 7.x to 8.x. While is a major version jump, it does not imply the huger change in the CLI as it was with the upgrade from 6.x to 7.x. There is quite a bunch of new features in 8.x code (you will see the list later) but most of them are minor ones. Most likely you will enjoy things like Dynamic Access Policies, LDAP Authentication and Authorization, Secure Desktop Enhancements, EIGRP Support (who needs that?:), Transparent Firewall NAT and Traffic Shaping. However, if you are solid with the code version 7.x you wont face big problems mastering the new topics.
  • IPS software upgrade from 5.1 to 6.1 and the platform change to 4240. The catch here is that IPS v6.1 does not support many older IDS/IPS appliances, such as 4215 or 4235 and getting a 4240 might be expensive. However, there is some good news still. The CLI has not changed as much as it did with the 4.x to 5.1 upgrade, and all your 5.1 knowledge remains valid and up to date. The most notable new features are Virtual Sensors, Anomaly Detection, Threat Rating and the new IPS Manager Express. If you are OK with doing all your configurations via CLI, you can stick with IPS v6.0 which you could run on the older platforms (4215, 4235) as there are just minor differences between 6.0 and 6.1 (mostly related to IPS Manager Express). Probably the best news is that the old 4215 platform could be successfully emulated in VMware.

Now, let’s look at the v2.0 to v3.0 upgrade path that you can take with out products. Below is the list of the VOL1 technology labs. You can see the outdated topics being deleted and the new topics (which are being developed) highlighted. Naturally, many older labs remain perfectly valid for the new track, and you can continue practicing them while waiting for the upgrade being released. We also decided to keep the NAC labs, even though NAC is not on the current blueprint, mostly because it gives you a perfect scenario for advanced ACS configuration. Of course, if you own our current v2.0 products, you will receive the v3.0 updates free of charge.

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Jan
28

One of the many skills that you must demonstrate as a CCENT candidate is your ability to configure basic password security on a Cisco router or switch. This blog post walks you through the configurations you must have mastered in order to succeed in this area of the exam.

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Jan
27

One of my student friends from Cisco RTP suggested a great weekly addition to our blog – a sample task from a Mock Lab to challenge the blog faithful. Cool idea! Love it! To not spoil your fun when taking our Mock Labs, these tasks have been written special so that there is no carryover.

My first installment is a topic that could easily appear on either the R/S Lab or the Security Lab. Enjoy! You are more than welcome to post your suggested solution in the comments. I will wait a week and then post a solution in there myself – along with some explanation text. If you enjoy this new blog installment, you should check out our products, because they are even better! :-)

Here we go!

8.0 Security

8.1 DoS Protection

You are concerned about DoS attacks against a key perimeter router in your company. Configure R1 so that it limits the aggregate rate of ARP traffic toward the route processor to 75 packets per second. Routing control traffic marked with an IP Precedence value of 6 should be limited to 100 packets per second.

2 points

NOTE: The solution and walkthrough are posted in the comments below dated February 6, 2009. Once again, this is a fraction of what you receive in our products!

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Jan
25

Our blog site continues to skyrocket in viewers and active participants. Thank you so much for supporting this site and reading and commenting on what we have to say. We love to teach and WRITE, and without your support, the blog WRITING part would certainly be wasted. ☺

One of the things I keep noticing about our blog is Cisco questions pretty unrelated to a particular blog in the comments for a certain post. I wanted to take this opportunity to remind all of our readers about a powerful resource on our site for any questions you might have. It is our Online Community at http://ieoc.com.

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Jan
24

The OSPF section of Internetwork Expert’s CCIE Routing & Switching Lab Workbook Volume 1 Version 5.0 is completed and available on the members site.  The final release contains around 50 lab scenarios in approximately 250 pages, and covers all relevant aspects of OSPFv2 routing, with extra detail focused on understanding how OSPF path selection occurs, and reading the OSPF database.  The final release consists of the following sections:

  • OSPF over Broadcast Media
  • OSPF over Non-Broadcast Media
  • OSPF DR/BDR Election Manipulation
  • OSPF Network Point-to-Point
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Jan
24

There are some fundamental processes in network security that you should be aware of as you begin your journey to a Cisco Certified Technician. Some of these processes are obvious, while others are not so obvious. This blog post intends to make each one very simple to understand.

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Jan
23

New Class-on-Demand sessions have been posted to the Open Lecture Series Class-on-Demand as well as the Lab Meet-Up Class-on-Demand.  Updates to OSPF and Security for IEWB-RS Volume 1 Version 5 will be posted next week, along with some additional tasks on redistribution under the IP Routing section.  Stay tuned to the blog as announcements will be posted here as the sections are added.  Have a great weekend everybody!

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Jan
22

As we well know, one of the best features of Cisco IOS is the parser’s context sensitive help and tab-completion when typing in configuration or verification commands. One of the lesser known features related to this, however, is the ability to view all officially supported commands available in the parser on a per-mode basis on the CLI via the show parser dump command.

show parser dump lists all commands in exec mode, global configuration mode, route-map mode, etc. prefixed by the privilege level of the command. This includes the negation (e.g. “no router rip”) and the default (e.g. “default interface”) in addition to the actual command and its arguments. The advantage of this output is that you can quickly find the complete syntax for a command, or set of commands, just by filtering through the parser dump.

For example let’s take a look at the output of the “show parser dump route-map”, which shows us all commands under the route-map subconfiguration mode.

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Jan
21

There is a new Class-on-Demand for Understanding the Cisco Documentation available for public viewing. This CoD covers the new format of the documentation that has since changed from the old www.cisco.com/univercd/ format. Understanding how to navigate the documentation is a vital skill to passing the exam, so if you haven’t spent much time with the new format I would highly recommend you take a look at this CoD.

Happy Labbing!

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Jan
20

It is interesting that you can pass the CCIE R/S lab exam with very little debugging, and a relatively short list of show commands – here are some of our favorites:

Catalyst

show vlan brief
show interface trunk
show interface switchport
show vtp status
show spanning-tree vlan

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