Archive for June, 2013

Jun
27

The scheduler for the CCIE SCv4 racks is now live. This means you can schedule your sessions for our new SCv4 racks through our members site. Additionally the feedback we received from the beta testers was overwhelmingly positive in regards to our new virtual machine management interface along with the fact we included ALL of the hardware and software from the CCIE SCv4 lab blueprint which is unmatched.

Lastly as I stated previously the pricing will remain for now the old SCv3 rack price of 10 tokens per session.

UPDATE – Tomorrow afternoon (July 3rd) the rack scheduler will be updated to include 8 additional SCv4 racks.

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Jun
23

Edit:  For those asking where to meet me tomorrow for passes, my first session is “BRKCRT-8862 – Cisco Certified Architect: How to complete the journey from CCIE to CCDE to CCAr” which I believe is in room 309.  The session runs from 8am – 9:30am, and I’ll be hanging around outside the room after the session for a bit if you want to come get passes.  After that check my twitter to come meet up with me!

 

Today wrapped up Day 0 of Cisco Live 2013 in Orlando Florida, US (#clus).  Brian Dennis and I attended the CCIE Routing and Switching Techtorial (TECCCIE-8000), and despite rumors of a blueprint change, CCIE R&S is going to remain as the current version 4 for the near future.  Version 5 is of course on the horizon, but I think the official announcement is still a ways out (Cisco Live 2014 Milan Italy?).

Me (Brian McGahan), Bruno van de Werve – CCIE R&S Exam Product Manager, and Brian Dennis

In other news, all of us here at INE our gearing up with final preparations for our CCIE Candidate Party 2013 at the Hard Rock Hotel!  We’re expecting a *huge* turnout, and along with prizes of iPads, MacBook Airs, AAP Memberships, and Bootcamps, just to name a few, we are giving away a Harley Davidson 2013 XL 1200X Forty-Eight!

If you don’t already have passes to the party, follow me on twitter, along with Brian Dennis and Mark Snow to meet up with any of us tomorrow to get admission passes.  I hope to see you all there, it’s going to be a rockin’ time!

 

 

Jun
21

Just as every year, I will be attending the additional 8-hour CCIE Voice/Collaboration Techtorial at Cisco Live, this Sunday June 23 2013, and will be tweeting live all of the additional nuanced details that I find out about changes to the CCIE Collaboration exam as it transitions from Voice. I’ve already downloaded the slide deck, and there are plenty of mentions about the new Collab track, but nothing that we don’t yet already know. You can be sure that many questions will be asked and those will yield the information worth tuning in for. You can follow me on Twitter for up-to-the-minute information, and then as I do every year, I’ll create a summary post here that includes all the details that were discussed.

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Jun
21

All,
We’re moving the SCv4 racks to beta this weekend and through next week. If you would like to try out the racks free of charge, send an email to me directly (bdennis @ ine.com) and I’ll see about getting you accommodated. I’ll reply to the emails I receive by tomorrow late afternoon (EST).

Additionally I’m going to have added to everyone’s members site account who purchased the SCv4 workbook, SCv4 Workbook Bundle or SCv3 workbook the after October 2012 enough tokens for ten sessions on the new SCv4 racks. These will appear next week in your account. Also I’ll keep the SCv4 racks priced at the old SC rack pricing of 10 tokens for the next few months.

Lastly many of you have asked about adding the primer videos to the SCv4 Ultimate Bundle which I’ve done. If you purchased an SCv4 Ultimate Bundle you should see the primer videos in your account and if not just hop on chat with Sales or email them and they’ll get it added.

Good luck with your preparation!

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Jun
19

A few weeks back I posted about the top contributors for IEOC in May receiving prizes (iPads, Mac Air, etc) from INE. Below are the top contributors for IEOC in their respective categories along with the overall top contributor and the one additional contributor that I’ll give an iPad or Galaxy Tablet to for helping with workbook support.

CCIE Data Center Technical
Antonio Soares

CCIE Voice Technical
brandon

CCIE Routing & Switching Technical
daniel.dib

CCIE Security Technical
qqabdal

CCIE Service Provider Technical
Narayan.Neupane

Top Overall IEOC Contributor:
Narayan.Neupane

Additional Top Contributor in regards to the workbooks in general:
JoeM

Jessica Oldow will be contacting the winners tomorrow to get their shipping addresses. Also if you own a few iPad’s already from INE (looking at you there daniel.dib ;-) you can just have them sent as an Apple Store gift card if you want.

We’ll do the same prizes for June that we did for May so don’t miss out!

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Jun
15

The image below says it all.

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Jun
07

This evening it’s topping 100 degrees in Reno, NV where our rack rental equipment is located. I’m looking at the temperature in our new data center to see how it’s holding up in regards to the high exterior temperature. We have temperature sensors for each cage in our existing data center but so far only have a few installed in our new data center. I’m looking to see what the temperature is in a couple new cages in the new data center that don’t have a temperature senor installed yet. So how can we get the temperature without a dedicated senor and only Cisco devices installed?

Relatively newer Cisco hardware has the ability to display the numerical temperature values by using the show environment command along with polling via SNMP. For the ISR G1′s (1800, 2800, 3800) the internal-ambient, CPU, intake and backplane temperature (3845) and for the ISR G2′s (1900, 2900, 3900) the intake left(bezel), intake left, exhaust right(bezel), exhaust right, CPU and power supply unit temperature can be displayed/polled. I wanted to see the temperature of the management access server (3825′s) located at the top of each cage. I assumed I would just login and issue the show environment command to see the values. Good idea but I don’t want to check it manually every few hours.

I could just login to SolarWinds and see the temperature but as we network engineers know, network management applications aren’t that fun to use. You buy them, install them, swear they are the best thing since sliced bread, drool over the fancy graphs and then two months later you never log back into them unless something is wrong. Plus my normal thought process is to always try and do whatever possible via the IOS as it’s the most fun.

To start I’ll display the values via the show environment command and then poll the values using the SNMP via TCLSH and finally wrap it up with an EEM applet to log the values.

Row8Cage1AS#show environment
 Redundant Power System is not present OR in standby mode.

 SYS PS1 is present.
        Type: AC

 AUX(-48V) PS1 is absent.

 Fan  1 OK
 Fan  2 OK
 Fan  3 OK

 Fan Speed Setting: Normal

 Alert settings:
 Intake temperature warning: Enabled, Threshold: 55
 Core temperature warning: Enabled, Threshold: 70 (CPU: 95)

 Board Temperature: Normal
 Internal-ambient temperature = 33, Normal
 CPU temperature = 50, Normal
 Intake temperature = 32, Normal

 Voltage 1(3300) is Normal, Current voltage = 3300 mV
 Voltage 2(5150) is Normal, Current voltage = 5153 mV
 Voltage 3(2500) is Normal, Current voltage = 2525 mV
 Voltage 4(1200) is Normal, Current voltage = 1215 mV 

 Nominal frequency

Row8Cage1AS#

Now I need to find the SNMP OID related to temperature for the platform. Note that SNMP has previous been setup on this router.

Row8Cage1AS#show snmp mib | in Temperature
ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.2
ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3
ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.4
ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.5
ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.6
c3gModemTemperature
Row8Cage1AS#

I know it’s one of the ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry values but which one? One should be the name, another should be the actual values and another should be the thresholds. Seems like Google should be used here but we know the values via the show environment command so we could poll them and see which one matches. We’ll learn more this way over using Google. We’ll start with the first one and walk down 99.

Row8Cage1AS#tclsh
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#snmp_getbulk
usage: snmp_getbulk community_string non_repeaters max_repetitions oid [oid2 oid3 ...]
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#snmp_getbulk XXXXXX 0 99 ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.2
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.2.1' val='Internal-ambient'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.2.2' val='CPU'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.2.3' val='Intake'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.1' val='33'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.2' val='50'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.3' val='32'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.4.1' val='70'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.4.2' val='95'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.4.3' val='55'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.5.1' val='0'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.5.2' val='0'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.5.3' val='0'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.6.1' val='1'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.6.2' val='1'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.6.3' val='1'/>}

Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#snmp_getbulk XXXXXX 0 3 ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.1' val='33'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.2' val='50'/>}
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.3' val='32'/>}
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#

That was easy. The ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3 is what we are looking for and ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.1 is a good value to use as it’s giving us the “internal ambient” temperature.

Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#snmp_getone
usage: snmp_getone community_string oid [oid2 oid3 ...]
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#snmp_getone XXXXXX ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.1
{<obj oid='ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.1' val='33'/>}
Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#

Now how about having this value logged every 5 minutes so we can check back in the morning to see any changes overnight. An easy way to do this is to poll the SNMP OID using EEM and log the value returned using syslog if it’s above 1 degree which we know it will always be. This way EEM will always log the value to syslog.

Row8Cage1AS(tcl)#tclquit
Row8Cage1AS#conf t
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Row8Cage1AS(config)#event manager applet EEM_TEMP_MON
Row8Cage1AS(config-applet)#event snmp oid ciscoEnvMonTemperatureStatusEntry.3.1 get-type exact entry-op gt entry-val 1 poll-interval 300
Row8Cage1AS(config-applet)#action 1.0 syslog msg "Row8Cage1AS Temperature $_snmp_oid_val"
Row8Cage1AS(config-applet)#^Z
Row8Cage1AS#
Jun  7 06:53:42.011: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console by bdennis on vty0
Row8Cage1AS#
Jun  7 06:54:12.012: %HA_EM-6-LOG: EEM_TEMP_MON: Row8Cage1AS Temperature: 33

We could convert the value to fahrenheit if we wanted by using this TCL expression: set temp [expr {9.0*$_snmp_oid_val/5.0+32.0}].

Of course using a network management application or script on a server would be easier but doing it via the IOS was fun. There are a few other ways to do this via the IOS and one being SNMP MIB BULKSTAT.

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Jun
05

After a huge outcry by many on Twitter, Facebook and even a Change.org petition with currently almost 1,200 signatures gathered in less than a week, Cisco seems to have recanted their position, and will be allowing current CCIE Voice certified individuals, as well as those that certify before the February 14, 2014 switchover date, to migrate to the new CCIE Collaboration, simply by taking and passing the new CCIE Collaboration Written exam, which will debut on November 21, 2013.

Here is the official statement from Cisco.

To all of our CCIE Voice professionals. Here is a statement from Fred Weiller, Director of Marketing at Learning@Cisco:

“We are listening to the feedback from our valued CCIE community, and will be adjusting the CCIE Collaboration requirements. As a quick preview of the evolution of the CCIE Collaboration certification, a current holder of the CCIE Voice designation will now be able to migrate to a CCIE Collaboration credential by taking the CCIE Collaboration written exam only. We appreciate all of the great feedback and patience of the community while we update our webpages to reflect this change. We will be communicating further details about this modification as soon as possible.”

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Jun
03

I put together a new playlist on our All Access Pass geared toward helping those that have decided to study primarily with the new CCIE Collaboration in mind. What will be included in this playlist is primarily new technologies, specifically those that haven’t yet been covered elsewhere in our CCIE Voice v3 products. As the weeks go on, I will continue to update this list with more and more videos covering new technologies in UC v9.1. Keep in mind that until I have this list complete with everything that is newer than UCM 7.x, that you can and should still study all of our CCIE Voice v3 products, as everything except for H.323 RAS/Gatekeeper will still be completely relevant and a very much needed base for your understanding. Once I complete this list, I will probably leave it up for those only wanting to learn the new stuff, like those of you that are already CCIE Voice v3 certified (if you certified on CCIE Voice v2 or v1, and haven’t really used it in a while, you’re going to want to watch all the material over again as quite a LOT changed from v2 to v3). Also, once I complete this playlist with all the new technologies, I will be recording a completely new top-to-bottom CCIE Collaboration Advanced Technologies Class, that will include everything. And of course, the workbook is being completely re-written as well in our new online format, which you can see a sample of here and here. This video playlist is meant to not only hold you over until then, but also to be able to release material to you in a timely, incremental fashion.

To start with, here is 4.5 hours of material on Call Control Discovery over Service Advertisement Framework (CCDoSAF). At a most basic description, this is dynamic routing of DNs over an enhanced, named instance of EIGRP. It is currently much more detailed and complex than ILS (a newer and much more scalable dynamic routing protocol built-in natively to UCM), but it is also currently far more powerful and allows for things like SRST integration for failover usage with PSTN Aliases, as well as cluster-to-cluster PSTN failover, should the primary SIP/H.323 trunk route go down. Cisco pushes ILS much more in production and it is getting much more support with UCM 10.x, but since the new lab tests on 9.x, and the fact that no CCIE Lab exam has ever been that much interested in real-world design –favoring complexity over ease of configuration and good design– and the fact that it is very much on the new blueprint, I’d say you best get used to it now, even if it is going away. Also, I recorded these videos on a UCM v8.5 cluster, but that shouldn’t matter as this feature hasn’t changed since then.

The link for CCDoSAF on the UCM 9.1 Features and Services Guide can be found here.

The link for the playlist is here.

I start off with a general overview including a few slides just for concept, and then I move into hands-on demonstration of the following topic areas:

  • CUCM Inter-Cluster Call Routing
  • CUCM Call Routing with PSTN Failover
  • CUCM Call Routing during SRST Fallback
  • CUCM to CME Call Routing
  • Inter-Cluster RSVP via SIP Preconditions

Enjoy.

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