Posts from ‘IGP’

Apr
04

Hi Brian,

What is the major difference in using an E1 route over an E2 route in OSPF?

From what I’ve observed, if you redistribute a route into OSPF either E1 or E2, the upstream router will still use the shortest path to get to the ASBR regardless of what is shown in the routing table.

The more I read about this, the more confused I get. Am I missing something?

Matt

Hi Matt,

This is actually a very common area of confusion and misunderstanding in OSPF. Part of the problem is that the vast majority of CCNA and CCNP texts teach the theory that for OSPF path selection of E1 vs E2 routes, E1 routes use the redistributed cost plus the cost to the ASBR, while with E2 routes only use the redistributed cost. When I just checked the most recent CCNP ROUTE text from Cisco Press, it specifically says that “[w]hen flooded, OSPF has little work to do to calculate the metric for an E2 route, because by definition, the E2 route’s metric is simply the metric listed in the Type 5 LSA. In other words, the OSPF routers do not add any internal OSPF cost to the metric for an E2 route.” While technically true, this statement is an oversimplification. For CCNP level, this might be fine, but for CCIE level it is not.

The key point that I’ll demonstrate in this post is that while it is true that “OSPF routers do not add any internal OSPF cost to the metric for an E2 route”, both the intra-area and inter-area cost is still considered in the OSPF path selection state machine for these routes.

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Mar
30

OSPF and MTU Mismatch

Dear Brian,

What is the difference between using the “system mtu routing 1500” and the “ip ospf mtu-ignore” commands when running OSPF between a router and a switch?

Thanks,

Paul

Hi Paul,

Within the scope of the CCIE Lab Exam, it may be acceptable to issue either of these commands to solve a specific lab task. However, it is key to note that there is a difference between ignoring the MTU for the purpose of OSPF adjacency and matching the MTU within a real production network.

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Jan
08

One of the most important technical protocols on the planet is Open Shortest Path First (OSPF). This highly tunable and very scalable Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) was designed as the replacement technology for the very problematic Routing Information Protocol (RIP). As such, it has become the IGP chosen by many corporate enterprises.

OSPF’s design, operation, implementation and maintenance can be extremely complex. The 3-Day INE bootcamp dedicated to this protocol will be the most in-depth coverage in the history of INE videos.

This course will be developed by Brian McGahan, and Petr Lapukhov. It will be delivered online in a Self-Paced format. The course will be available for purchase soon for $295.

Here is a preliminary outline:

Day 1 OSPF Operations

●      Dijkstra Algorithm

●      Neighbors and Adjacencies

○   OSPF Packet Formats

○   OSPF Authentication

○   Link-State information Flooding

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Jan
03

Continuing my review of titles from Petr’s excellent CCDE reading list for his upcoming LIVE and ONLINE CCDE Bootcamps, here are further notes to keep in mind regarding EIGRP.

About the Protocol

  • The algorithm used for this advanced Distance Vector protocol is the Diffusing Update Algorithm.
  • As we discussed at length in this post, the metric is based upon Bandwidth and Delay values.
  • For updates, EIGRP uses Update and Query packets that are sent to a multicast address.
  • Split horizon and DUAL form the basis of loop prevention for EIGRP.
  • EIGRP is a classless routing protocol that is capable of Variable Length Subnet Masking.
  • Automatic summarization is on by default, but summarization and filtering can be accomplished anywhere inside the network.

Neighbor Adjacencies

EIGRP forms “neighbor relationships” as a key part of its operation. Hello packets are used to help maintain the relationship. A hold time dictates the assumption that a neighbor is no longer accessible and causes the removal of topology information learned from that neighbor. This hold timer value is reset when any packet is received from the neighbor, not just a Hello packet.

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Jan
01

This document is presented as a series of Questions and Answers, discussing various aspects of OSPF protocol designed to prevent inter-area routing loops and related issues. The discussion covers ABR functions, Virtual-Links, OSPF Super-backbone, OSPF Sham-Links, BGP Cost Community. Reader is assumed to know these concepts already, as this publication focuses on complex interaction features arising in MPLS/BGP VPN scenarios. The discussion is culminated by analyzing a number of issues arising in complex multi-area multi-homed OSPF site deployed in MPLS VPN environment. Please download the following document to read the publication: Loop Prevention in OSPF

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Dec
30

To start my reading from Petr’s excellent CCDE reading list for his upcoming LIVE and ONLINE CCDE Bootcamps, I decided to start with:
EIGRP for IP: Basic Operation and Configuration by Russ White and Alvaro Retana
I was able to grab an Amazon Kindle version for about $9, and EIGRP has always been one of my favorite protocols.
The text dives right in to none other than the composite metric of EIGRP and it brought a smile to my face as I thought about all of the misconceptions I had regarding this topic from early on in my Cisco studies. Let us review some key points regarding this metric and hopefully put some of your own misconceptions to rest.

  • While we are taught since CCNA days that the EIGRP metric consists of 5 possible components – BW, Delay, Load, Reliability, and MTU; we realize when we look at the actual formula for the metric computation, MTU is actually not part of the metric. Why have we been taught this then? Cisco indicates that MTU is used as a tie-breaker in a situation that might require it. To review the actual formula that is used to compute the metric, click here.
  • Notice from the formula that the K (constant values) impact which components of the metric are actually considered. By default K1 is set to 1 and K3 is set to 1 to ensure that Bandwidth and Delay are utilized in the calculation. If you wanted to make Bandwidth twice as significant in the calculation, you could set K1 to 2, as an example. The metric weights command is used for this manipulation. Note that it starts with a TOS parameter that should always be set to 0. Cisco never did fully implement this functionality.
  • The Bandwidth that effects the metric is taken from the bandwidth command used in interface configuration mode. Obviously, if you do not provide this value – the Cisco router will select a default based on the interface type.
  • The Delay value that effects the metric is taken from the delay command used in interface configuration mode. This value depends on the interface hardware type, e.g. it is lower for Ethernet but higher for Serial interfaces. Note how the Delay parameter allows you to influence EIGRP pathing decisions without the manipulation of the Bandwidth value. This is nice since other mechanisms could be relying heavily on the bandwidth setting, e.g. EIGRP bandwidth pacing or absolute QoS reservation values for CBWFQ.
  • The actual metric value for a prefix is derived from the SUM of the delay values in the path, and the LOWEST bandwidth value along the path. This is yet another reason to use more predictive Delay manipulations to change EIGRP path preference.

In the next post on the EIGRP metric, we will examine this at the actual command line, and discuss EIGRP load balancing options. Thanks for reading!

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Sep
03

I enjoyed Petr’s article regarding explicit next hop.  It reminded me of a scenario where a redistributed route, going into OSPF conditionally worked, depending on which reachable next hop was used.

Here is the topology for the scenario:

3 routers ospf fa blogpost

Here is the relevant (and working :) ) information for R1. Continue Reading

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Sep
02

Abstract

This publication briefly covers the use of 3rd party next-hops in OSPF, RIP, EIGRP and BGP routing protocols. Common concepts are introduced and protocol-specific implementations are discussed. Basic understanding of the routing protocol function is required before reading this blog post.

Overview

Third-party next-hop concept appears only to distance vector protocol, or in the parts of the link-state protocols that exhibit distance-vector behavior. The idea is that a distance-vector update carries explicit next-hop value, which is used by receiving side, as opposed to the “implicit” next-hop calculated as the sending router’s address – the source address in the IP header carrying the routing update. Such “explicit” next-hop is called “third-party” next-hop IP address, allowing for pointing to a different next-hop, other than advertising router. Intitively, this is only possible if the advertising and receiving router are on a shared segment, but the “shared segment” concept could be generalized and abstracted. Every popular distance-vector protocols support third party next-hop – RIPv2, EIGRP, OSPF and BGP all carry explicit next-hop value. Look at the figure below – it illustrates the situation where two different distance-vector protocols are running on the shared segment, but none of them runs on all routers attached to the segment. The protocols “overlap” at a “pivotal” router and redistribution is used to provide inter-protocol route exchange.

third-party-nh-generic
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Jun
02

This goal of this post is brief discussion of main factors controlling fast convergence in OSPF-based networks. Network convergence is a term that is sometimes used under various interpretations. Before we discuss the optimization procedures for OSPF, we define network convergence as the process of synchronizing network forwarding tables after a topology change. Network is said to be converged when none of forwarding tables are changing for “some reasonable” amount of time. This “some” amount of time could be defined as some interval, based on the expected maximum time to stabilize after a single topology change. Network convergence based on native IGP mechanisms is also known as network restoration, since it heals the lost connections. Network mechanisms for traffic protection such as ECMP, MPLS FRR or IP FRR offering different approach to failure handling are outside the scope of this article. We are further taking multicast routing fast recovery out of the scope as well, even though this process is tied to IGP re-convergence.

It is interesting to notice that IGP-based “restoration” techniques have one (more or less) important problem. During the time of re-convergence, temporary micro-loops may exist in the topology due to inconsistency of FIB (forwarding) tables of different routers. This behavior is fundamental to link-state algorithms, as routers closer to failure tend to update their forwarding database before the other routers. The only popular routing protocol that lacks this property is EIGRP, which is loop-free at any moment during re-convergence, thanks to the explicit termination of the diffusing computations. For the link state-protocols, there are some enhancements to the FIB update procedures that allow avoiding such micro-loops with link-state routing, described in the document [ORDERED-FIB].

Even though we are mainly concerned with OSPF, ISIS will be mentioned in the discussion as well. It should be noted that compared to IS-IS, OSPF provides less “knobs” for convergence optimization. The main reason is probably the fact that ISIS is being developed and supported by a separate team of developers, more geared towards the ISPs where fast convergence is a critical competitive factor. The common optimization principles, however, are the same for both protocols, and during the conversation will point out at the features that OSPF lacks while IS-IS has for tuning. Finally, we start our discussion with a formula, which is further explained in the text:

Convergence = Failure_Detection_Time + Event_Propagation_Time + SPF_Run_Time + RIB_FIB_Update_Time

The formula reflects the fact that convergence time for a link-state protocol is sum of the following components:

  • Time to detect the network failure, e.g. interface down condition.
  • Time to propagate the event, i.e. flood the LSA across the topology.
  • Time to perform SPF calculations on all routers upon reception of the new information.
  • Time to update the forwarding tables for all routers in the area.

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May
03

The purpose of event dampening is reducing the effect of oscillations on routing systems. In general, periodic process that affect the routing system as a whole should have the period no shorter than the system convergence time (relaxation time). Otherwise, the system will never stabilize and will be constantly updating its state. In reality, complex system have multiple periodic processes running at the same time, which results is in harmonic process interference and complex process spectrum. Considering such behavior is outside the scope of this paper. What we want to do, is finding optimal settings to filter high-frequency events from the routing system. In our particular case, events are interface flaps, occurring periodically. We want to make sure that oscillations with period T or less are not reported to the routing system. Here T is found empirically, based on observed/estimated convergence time as suggested above.

Event dampening uses exponential back-off algorithm to suppress event reporting to the upper level protocols. Effectively, every time an interface flaps (goes down, to be accurate) a penalty value of P is added to the interface penalty counter. If at some point the accumulated penalty exceeds the “suppress” value of S, the interface is placed in the suppress state and further link events are not reported to the upper protocol modules. At all time, the interface penalty counter follows exponential decay process based on the formula P(t)=P(0)*2^(-t/H) where H is half-life time setting for the process. As soon as accumulated penalty reaches the lower boundary of R – the reuse value, interface is unsuppressed, and further changes are again reported to the upper level protocols.

optimized-dampening
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