Posts from ‘CCNA’

Jun
06



There’s no easy path to success in the IT sector, but there are certainly ways to increase your chances of having a rewarding career. One of the ways is knowing which fields in IT have the most potential for future growth. There are a lot of great choices out there, but as technology changes, so does the demand for certain positions. That’s why it’s crucial to plan for your training in advance, and lock in on an area where forecasters expect rapid growth over the next few years. Choose from the following list of the fastest growing IT jobs to land a rewarding position that’s certain to last.


1. Data Scientist


Not surprisingly, data science is one of the fastest growing and most lucrative jobs in the IT sector. Data scientists wrestle with big data on a daily basis. They use their advanced skills in programming, mathematics, and statistics to organize enormous amounts of jumbled data into a more usable form.
The work of the data scientist doesn’t stop there. Once they make this data more manageable, they use their analytical skills to solve a variety of business and financial problems. These skills include industry specific knowledge, contextual awareness, and a willingness to question assumptions. Depending on location and company, data scientists can quickly begin earning between $100,000-$150,000 a year.
Here are a few certifications that make data science candidates more attractive:

● AWS Big Data Specialty Certification
● Certified Analytics Professional (CAP)
● EMC Data Science Associate (EMCDSA)

2. Information Security Analyst


With cyber criminals getting smarter every day, tight security is now more important than ever. This applies to companies from every industry sector. The need for constantly tighter security also ensures that highly skilled information security analysts will always be in demand.
The average base salary for information security analysts is just over $76,000 a year. They additionally earn an average of about $5,300 in bonuses and other incentive programs, with some receiving up to about $14,000 a year. Do the math and you’ll see why the certifications you’ll need are more than justified.
There is a wide range of certifications that will make you a much more attractive candidate:

● Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)
● Cisco CCIE Security Certification
● Certified Information Security Manager (CISM)
● Comptia Security+

While these aren’t the only IT security certifications available, they’ll certainly get you off to a good start.

3. IT Consultant


Due to the nature of their work, IT Consultants will always be in high demand. While it may vary from company to company, an IT consultant’s chief responsibility is advising clients on the most efficient use of their information technology. They also help improve the existing structure of a company’s IT, with an emphasis on dynamic, industry specific problem solving.
The average base salary for an IT Consultant who’s just starting out is approximately $70,000 a year. However, the salaries in closely related jobs such as Senior IT Consultants or IT Project Managers can range from $80,000-$107,000 a year.
The following IT Consultant certifications will help you land the best possible job:

● Project Management Professional (PMP)
● Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)
● International Information Systems Certification Consortium (CISSP)
● Information Systems Audit and Control Associate (ISACA)

4. Network Architect


The field of Network Architecture also promises to continue growing at a rapid rate. Just as the name implies, a Network Architect designs and implements computer networks for companies from a wide variety of industry sectors. These include networks like the familiar local area network (LAN), intranets, and wide area networks (WAN). Depending on the company, these networks can connect anything from a few offices to an internationally distributed communication system.
In addition to having a rosy growth forecast, Network Architects also earn an excellent salary. The exact figures depend on location, company, and level of experience, but they typically range between $60,000-$140,00 a year. The median Network Architect salary is approximately $91,000 a year.
Like most attractive IT jobs, there are a number of Network Architecture certifications available. Choose from among these to nab the best job and maximize your chances for advancement:

● Cisco CCIE Collaboration Certification
● Cisco CCIE Data Center Certification
● Cisco CCIE Routing and Switching Certification

5. Cloud Engineer


Cloud engineers are IT personnel who are responsible for tasks related to the field of cloud computing. The tasks involved in cloud computing can include initial design, cloud management, support, and maintenance.
Cloud engineers earn an average salary of about $95,000 a year. Many companies are looking for candidates with the following certifications:

• AWS Certified SysOps Administrator-Associate
• Cisco CCNA Cloud
• CompTIA Cloud+ Certification

Interested in pursuing one of the careers or certifications mentioned above? INE has all of the training materials necessary to help you pass your certification exams and land the job of your dreams. Check out all of our training solutions at ine.com.

Author: Benjamin Shepardson founder of NoStop Ghostwriting. As the company’s leader, Ben brings to the table an innate ability to help small businesses compete with larger competitors through content strategies and SEO.


References

    “What Is a Data Scientist?” Multichannel Marketing: What It Is and Why It Matters | SAS, www.sas.com/en_us/insights/analytics/what-is-a-data-scientist.html.
    “Salary: Data Scientist.” Glassdoor, www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/data-scientist-salary-SRCH_KO0,14.htm.
    Jobs, Best Technology. “How Much Can a Information Security Analyst Expect to Get Paid?” U.S. News & World Report, U.S. News & World Report, money.usnews.com/careers/best-jobs/information-security-analyst/salary.
    “Salary: Information Security Analyst.” Glassdoor, www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/information-security-analyst-salary-SRCH_KO0,28.htm.
    “Salary: IT Consultant.” Glassdoor, www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/it-consultant-salary-SRCH_KO0,13.htm.
    “Salary: Senior IT Consultant.” Glassdoor, www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/senior-it-consultant-salary-SRCH_KO0,20.htm.
    “Salary: IT Project Manager.” Glassdoor, www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/it-project-manager-salary-SRCH_KO0,18.htm.
    “Salary: Network Architect.” Glassdoor, www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/network-architect-salary-SRCH_KO0,17.htm.
    “What Is Cloud Computing? – Definition from WhatIs.com.” SearchCloudComputing, searchcloudcomputing.techtarget.com/definition/cloud-computing.
    “What Is Cloud Computing? – Definition from WhatIs.com.” SearchCloudComputing, searchcloudcomputing.techtarget.com/definition/cloud-computing.
    “Salary: Cloud Engineer.” Glassdoor, www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/cloud-engineer-salary-SRCH_KO0,14.htm.

May
07


Don’t miss our CCNA/CCNP Kickoff with Keith Bogart Tomorrow!

 

Join Keith May 8th at 10 am PST/ 1 pm EST for his CCNA/CCNP Kickoff.

This is a FREE live session that is open to everyone. In this open forum, you’ll have the opportunity to ask Keith all of your questions regarding the CCNA or CCNP Routing & Switching exam and related technologies.

Get all of your questions answered by an experienced industry expert! Just click here.

May
04

It’s that time again! Tune in on May 7 at 10 am PST/ 1 pm EST for our monthly CCNA Kickoff session with expert instructor Keith Bogart.

 

This is a FREE session in which Keith (CCIE #4923) will present everything you need to know to get started on your CCNA journey.


What Keith will cover in this months webinar:

  • How to get started by making a study schedule
  • Strategies to prevent you from becoming overwhelmed throughout the exam process
  • CCNA certification test format
  • Which topics to study, and how in depth
  • What study tools will be the most useful
  • What to expect when you walk into the testing center

You can view this, and all of our other webinars here.

Mar
14

Tomorrow, March 15th, we will air our March 2018 Networking Technologies Live Session with Keith Bogart. This course is designed for those with absolutely no knowledge of computer networks, but who would like to learn more and possibly head down a career path working on computer networks.

 

    When:
    March 16, 2018 10 am PST/ 1 pm EST


    Instructor Info:
    This Course is taught by Keith Bogart, CCIE #4923. Keith started his networking career as customer service representative at Cisco Systems in 1996. His desire to learn more soon led him to a position as a Cisco Technical Assistance Center (TAC) engineer on the “Dial-Access” team, and within six months he had obtained his Dial-ISP CCIE. He later became a network consulting engineer and obtained his CCNA certification while teaching the technologies to Cisco employees during his lunch breaks. Keith was the first instructor on Cisco’s TAC Training team, where he taught a wide range of internetworking topics and later developed and taught other courses such as routing protocols, LAN switching, MPLS, 802.1x, and CCNA. After almost 17 years with Cisco, Keith joined a small startup and focused on 802.11 Wi-Fi technologies, during which time he obtained his CWNA certification. He is now very happy to be working with INE as an instructor for Routing & Switching.


    Who Should Watch:
    Anyone with little to no knowledge about the IT and networking industry that would like to learn more.


    Why You Should Watch:
    This live session will allow you to find out more about what a computer network is, what types of things it can be used for, and what types of careers are available for those who want to design, install, monitor, and troubleshoot networks by asking questions, and discussing these topics with an industry expert.
Mar
09

Don’t forget to watch Keith Bogart’s live CCNA/CCNP Q&A session TODAY at 1pm!

 

During this live Q&A Keith bogart will answer all of your questions about the Cisco CCNA and CCNP Routing and Switching exams. Check back at 1 pm (EST) to get all of your questions answered by an industry expert.

Mar
06

Watch our March 2018 CCNA Kickoff Session with Keith Bogart TOMORROW at 1:30 PM EST.

 

This kickoff session for those who are interested in, or have started to study for the CCNA certification. In this free session, we will cover common trouble areas that most people experience when getting started with their certification. Topics include: how to approach making a study schedule, strategies for not becoming overwhelmed during the study process, deciding whether to take one test or two to get your CCNA, what to expect when you walk into the testing center, which topics to study and how in depth, and what study tools can be useful. Keith will also discuss the testing experience and the CCNA Certification test format.

When: March 7th at 10:30 am PST/ 1:30 pm EST

Estimated Length: 3 hours

Instructor: Keith Bogart CCIE #4923

Cost: FREE

Feb
08

Presented by INE instructor Keith Bogart (CCIE #4923), this free 60 minute session is an open forum for anyone seeking information regarding the Cisco CCNA or CCNP Routing & Switching exam and related technologies. Ask questions live with an experienced industry expert!

 

When: February 9th at 10 am (PST)/1 pm (EST)

Who Should Watch: Anyone with questions about earning their associate or professional level Cisco certification

Instructor: Keith Bogart CCIE #4923

Jan
31

Tune into our live CCNA Kickoff session to get advice from a seasoned professional on what to expect during the CCNA Certification exam, and how to pass the first time.

When: February 1st at 10 am PST/ 1 pm EST

Estimated Length: 3 hours

Instructor: Keith Bogart CCIE #4923

Cost: FREE

Who Should Watch:
This webinar is for anyone and everyone! Since this webinar is geared towards those who are just starting out on their journey towards CCNA certification, no prior knowledge is needed in order to participate, just an interest in earning your CCNA.

What We’ll Discuss:
We will cover common trouble areas that most people experience when getting started with their CCNA certification, such as how to approach making a study schedule and strategies for not becoming overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of topics to be learned. We will also discuss the testing experience and the CCNA Certification test format. Topics include: Deciding whether to take one test or two to get your CCNA, What to expect when you walk into the testing center, which topics to study and how in depth, and what study tools can be useful. Last, Keith will talk about his own experience taking the CCNA exam and offer advice based off of his own personal observations.

Check Out All of Our Upcoming Webinars:

CCNA/CCNP Q&A: February 2018
February 9, 2018 10 am (PST)/ 1 PM (EST)

Deciphering Spanning-Tree Technologies
February 16, 2018 10 am (PST)/ 1 pm (EST)

Introduction to Networking Technologies
March 15, 2018 10 am (PST)/ 1 pm (EST)

May
15

 

The following question was recently sent to me regarding PPP and CHAP:

 

At the moment I only have packet tracer to practice on, and have been trying to setup CHAP over PPP.

It seems that the “PPP CHAP username xxxx” and “PPP CHAP password xxxx” commands are missing in packet tracer.

I have it set similar to this video… (you can skip the first 1 min 50 secs)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ltNfaPz0nA

As he doesn’t use the missing commands, if that were to be done on live kit would it just use the hostname and magic number to create the hash?

 

Also, in bi-directional authentication, do both routers have to use the same password or can they be different as long as they match what they expect from the other router?

Thanks, Paul.

 

Here was my reply:

Hi Paul,

When using PPP CHAP keep in mind four fundamental things:

  1. The “magic number” that you see in PPP LCP messages has nothing to do with Authentication or CHAP.  It is simply PPPs way of trying to verify that it has a bi-directional link with a peer. When sending a PPP LCP message a random Magic Number is generated.  The idea is that you should NOT see your own Magic Number in LCP messages received from your PPP Peer.  If you DO see the same magic number that you transmited, that means you are talking to yourself (your outgoing LCP CONFREQ message has been looped back to you).  This might happen if the Telco that is providing your circuit is doing some testing or something and has temporarily looped-back your circuit.
  2. At least one of the devices will be initiating the CHAP challenge.  In IOS this is enabled with the interface command, “ppp authentication chap”.  Technically it only has to be configured on one device (usually the ISP router that wishes to “challenge” the incoming caller) but with CHAP you can configure it on both sides if you wish to have bi-directional CHAP challenges.
  3. Both routers need a CHAP password, and you have a couple of options on how to do this.
  4. The “hash” that is generated in an outgoing PPP CHAP Response is created as a combination of three variables, and without knowing all three values the Hash Response cannot be generated:
  • A router’s Hostname
  • The configured PPP CHAP password
  • The PPP CHAP Challenge value

I do all of my lab testing on real hardware so I can’t speak to any “gotchas” that might be present in simulators like Packet Tracer.  But what I can tell you, is that on real routers the side that is receiving the CHAP challenge must be configured with an interface-level CHAP password.

The relevant configurations are below as an example.

ISP router that is initiating the CHAP Challenge for incoming callers:

username Customer password cisco
!
interface Serial1/3
 encapsulation ppp
 ppp authentication chap
 ip address x.x.x.x y.y.y.y
!

Customer router placing the outgoing PPP call to ISP:

hostname Customer
!
interface Serial1/3
 encapsulation ppp
 ppp chap password cisco
 ip address x.x.x.x y.y.y.y
!

If you have a situation where you expect that the Customer Router might be using this same interface to “call” multiple remote destinations, and use a different CHAP password for each remote location, then you could add the following:

 

Customer router placing the outgoing PPP call to ISP-1 (CHAP password = Bob) and ISP-2 (CHAP password = Sally):

hostname Customer
!
username ISP-1 password Bob
username ISP-2 password Sally
!
interface Serial1/3
 encapsulation ppp
 ppp chap password cisco
 ip address x.x.x.x y.y.y.y
!

Notice in the example above, the “username x password y” commands supercede the interface-level command, “ppp chap password x”. But please note that the customer (calling) router always needs the “ppp chap password” command configured at the interface level.  A global “username x password y” in the customer router does not replace this command.  In this situation, if the Customer router placed a call to ISP-3 (for which there IS no “username/password” statement) it would fallback to using the password configured at the interface-level.

Lastly, the “username x password y” command needs to be viewed differently depending on whether or not it is configured on the router that is RESPONDING to a Challenge…or is on the router that is GENERATING the Challenge:

  • When the command “username X password Y” is configured on the router that is responding to the CHAP Challenge (Customer router), the router’s local “hostname” and password in this command (along with the received Challenge) will be used in the Hash algorithm to generate the CHAP RESPONSE.

 

  • When the command “username X password Y” is configured on the router that is generating the CHAP Challenge (ISP Router), once the ISP router receives the CHAP Authentication Response (which includes the hostname of the Customer/calling router) it will match that received Hostname to a corresponding “username X password Y” statement. If one is found that matches, then the ISP router will perform its own CHAP hash of the username, password, and Challenge that it previously created to see if its own, locally-generated result matches the result that was received in the CHAP Response.

Lastly, you asked, “ Also, in bi-directional authentication, do both routers have to use the same password or can they be different as long as they match what they expect from the other router?”

Hopefully from my explanations above it is now clear that in the case of bi-directional authentication, the passwords do indeed have to be the same on both sides.

 

Hope that helps!

Keith

 


 

 

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May
10

There was an interesting post on IEOC yesterday in regards to an OSPF virtual link. Below is the original post and questions to win at the bottom of this post.

Okay, I have never came across anything like this before. On R2 and R3 connected via serial with HDLC. OSPF network type default to P2P. I configured VL using the OSPF RIDs of both routers. R3 VL comes up and R2 VL is down. I changed just about every option which makes logical sense and nothing works. I reboot and clear process and still nothing. Out of shear desperation I changed the network-types to P2MP on both sides and voila it works. I tried testing broadcast and that doesn’t work. Only difference I can find is the mask changed from /24 to /32 in the LSA…as it should. But I am not sure why this has any bearing on the VL coming up.

Rack1R2#show ip ospf vir

Virtual Link OSPF_VL8 to router 222.255.255.255 is down

Rack1R3#show ip ospf vir
Virtual Link OSPF_VL0 to router 150.1.2.2 is up

Rack1R2(config)#int s0/1/0
Rack1R2(config-if)#ip ospf network p
Rack1R2(config-if)#ip ospf network point-to-m
*May 9 15:28:40.599: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 222.255.255.255 on Serial0/1/0 from FULL to DOWN, Neighbor Down: Interface down or detached
*May 9 15:28:41.007: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 222.255.255.255 on Serial0/1/0 from LOADING to FULL, Loading Done
Rack1R2(config-if)#
*May 9 15:28:46.815: %OSPF-5-ADJCHG: Process 1, Nbr 222.255.255.255 on OSPF_VL8 from LOADING to FULL, Loading Done
Any thoughts??

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