Posts Tagged ‘CCNA’


With the recent advent of the new 2.0 version CCNA, CCNP and CCIE Wireless certifications, as well as the (probably more notable) CCIE Data Center being announced this week (something that we reported to you first 8 months ago), INE is proud to announce that we are developing training for both of these prestigious Cisco certification tracks. We should have CCNA, CCNP and CCIE Wireless products all covering the new 2.0 version by this summer, and we will be purchasing at least one complete Data Center rack and develop courseware surrounding that new CCIE as well. We will evaluate the market, and our costs to asses if it is feasible to procure more CCIE Data Center racks for rental at that time.

Also we should note that we have just finished up 62 hours of a brand new CCNP Voice v8 bootcamp that will be available for stream or download next week, and that our new CCNP Security bootcamp is being filmed beginning on Monday, April 30, and should be available for stream or download the following week. Also that we will be adding 2 new CCIE Voice labs to our Volume II workbook here in the next month (one in about a week and one in about 3 weeks), and lastly (but by no means even close to least) that we are on track to release the new CCIE SPv3 workbook by the end of next week.

We look forward to working with all of you in your certification endeavors!
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Just ahead of our brand new CCNA Voice live online bootcamp beginning this Monday, I thought it might be nice to provide an easy-to-follow graphic for those starting out in Voice (or on any other Cisco networking track). This graphic was from last year, but remains quite easy to follow for each and every Cisco track.

Be sure you have a high resolution set if you wish to see the entire thing, otherwise scrolling may be necessary.

Click here for the Cisco Career Certification Path poster

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INE is proud to announce the release of two brand new video products, the CCNA Routing & Switching Exam Course and the CCNA Routing & Switching Video Flashcards. Both of these products were written and delivered by Brian McGahan – three times CCIE #8593 in Routing & Switching, Security, and Service Provider – one of the most highly regarded and experienced CCIE instructors in the industry. Best of all, until Jan 1st 2012, streaming access is FREE to both the CCNA R&S Exam Course and CCNA R&S Video Flashcards, while download access to the CCNA R&S Exam Course is only $99! Additionally these classes support streaming to iPhone/iPad, Android, and Windows phone platforms, so you can take your training on the go.

To view these classes create a free account on the INE Members Site, then follow the links there once logged in.

Specifically the CCNA R&S Exam Course is a comprehensive look at the technologies covered in the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) Routing & Switching exams. With over 25 hours of instructor-led videos, this class contains both easy to understand and in-depth explanations, along with hands-on examples on the Cisco IOS Command Line Interface. The class will not only fully prepare you for the latest 640-822 ICND1 (CCENT), 640-816 ICND2, and 640-802 CCNA exams, but it will also expand your understanding of core technologies that are essential to know for beginning or advancing your career with today’s networks.

The CCNA R&S Video Flashcards are designed to help you test you knowledge before you sit for the actual ICND1, ICND2, or CCNA Composite exams. The thing that sets the Video Flashcards apart from other practice tests is that after every question, the instructor goes through a detailed explanation as to what the answer is, why it is the answer, and includes visual and hands on examples of the pertinent technology. We are considering adding Video Flashcard products for our other CCNA, CCNP, and CCIE tracks, so please post your comments below and give us some feedback about what you think of the Video Flashcard format!

Both of the above products are part of our larger All Access Pass video library. Available as a $159 per month or $1599 per year subscription, INE’s All Access Pass contains hundreds of hours of videos covering topics such as:

  • CCNA Routing & Switching
  • CCNA Voice
  • CCNA Security
  • CCNP Routing & Switching
  • CCNP Voice
  • CCNP Security
  • CCIE Routing & Switching
  • CCIE Voice
  • CCIE Security
  • CCIE Service Provider
  • And more!

Feel free to post your feedback about the new CCNA videos here, or email Brian McGahan directly at

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Today’s challenge is drawn from the exciting area of CCNA Security. Enjoy. As always, you can find the answer in the comments area a day or two after the date of this post.

IINS-1: The CIA Triad seeks to define the three primary purposes for network security. These are to secure an organization’s data confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Define integrity as it is used in the CIA Triad. For bonus credit, provide the term texts often attribute the A for in CIA as opposed to Availability.

Answer: ______________________________________________________________________________

Bonus: _______________________

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To start my reading from Petr’s excellent CCDE reading list for his upcoming LIVE and ONLINE CCDE Bootcamps, I decided to start with:
EIGRP for IP: Basic Operation and Configuration by Russ White and Alvaro Retana
I was able to grab an Amazon Kindle version for about $9, and EIGRP has always been one of my favorite protocols.
The text dives right in to none other than the composite metric of EIGRP and it brought a smile to my face as I thought about all of the misconceptions I had regarding this topic from early on in my Cisco studies. Let us review some key points regarding this metric and hopefully put some of your own misconceptions to rest.

  • While we are taught since CCNA days that the EIGRP metric consists of 5 possible components – BW, Delay, Load, Reliability, and MTU; we realize when we look at the actual formula for the metric computation, MTU is actually not part of the metric. Why have we been taught this then? Cisco indicates that MTU is used as a tie-breaker in a situation that might require it. To review the actual formula that is used to compute the metric, click here.
  • Notice from the formula that the K (constant values) impact which components of the metric are actually considered. By default K1 is set to 1 and K3 is set to 1 to ensure that Bandwidth and Delay are utilized in the calculation. If you wanted to make Bandwidth twice as significant in the calculation, you could set K1 to 2, as an example. The metric weights command is used for this manipulation. Note that it starts with a TOS parameter that should always be set to 0. Cisco never did fully implement this functionality.
  • The Bandwidth that effects the metric is taken from the bandwidth command used in interface configuration mode. Obviously, if you do not provide this value – the Cisco router will select a default based on the interface type.
  • The Delay value that effects the metric is taken from the delay command used in interface configuration mode. This value depends on the interface hardware type, e.g. it is lower for Ethernet but higher for Serial interfaces. Note how the Delay parameter allows you to influence EIGRP pathing decisions without the manipulation of the Bandwidth value. This is nice since other mechanisms could be relying heavily on the bandwidth setting, e.g. EIGRP bandwidth pacing or absolute QoS reservation values for CBWFQ.
  • The actual metric value for a prefix is derived from the SUM of the delay values in the path, and the LOWEST bandwidth value along the path. This is yet another reason to use more predictive Delay manipulations to change EIGRP path preference.

In the next post on the EIGRP metric, we will examine this at the actual command line, and discuss EIGRP load balancing options. Thanks for reading!

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For Part 2 of this series – click here.

WARNING: You must master subnetting using our course or some other trusted materials before you start using these shortcut approaches. It is a common issue for Cisco candidates to move directly to subnetting shortcuts for the exams without fully understanding exactly how subnetting functions.


Question 3: Your co-worker has decided upon use of the address space for a section of your network. This section requires 15 subnets. What subnet mask will you recommend?

Step 1: I reference the Powers of Two chart I created on my scratch paper when I encountered the first question. The forumla for the number of subnets you can create based on subnet bits is 2^s. From the chart I see if we “borrow” 4 bits we can create 16 subnets.

2^7=128  |  2^6=64  |  2^5=32  |  2^4=16  |  2^3=8  |  2^2-=4 | 2  ^1=2  |  2^0=1

Step 2: Borrowing 4 bits beyond the Class B boundary results in 255.255.128+64+32+16 = 240. Our mask is

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Click here for Part 1 of this series.

WARNING: You must master subnetting using our course or some other trusted materials before you start using these shortcut approaches. It is a common issue for Cisco candidates to move directly to subnetting shortcuts for the exams without fully understanding exactly how subnetting functions.


Question 2: You have run the ipconfig command and discovered your IP address and mask are and How many hosts are permitted on your subnet?

Step 1: I reference the Powers of Two chart I created on my scratch paper when I encountered the first question. Adding 128 + 64 + 32 = 224. There are 3 bits used for subnetting and that leaves 5 bits for hosts.

2^7=128  |  2^6=64  |  2^5=32  |  2^4=16  |  2^3=8  |  2^2-=4 | 2  ^1=2  |  2^0=1

Step 2: The equation for the number of hosts per subnet is 2^h – 2 where h is the number of host bits. From the chart I see that 2^5  = 32. 32-2 = 30 hosts per subnet! Too easy!

As always, let us know in the comments if you have a quicker approach.

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Once I catch my breath and look back at one of our popular INE courses like the CCNA Wireless course, I can delve a bit deeper into certain subjects that we did not have time for in the course. This is one of those moments. Let us get more detailed about Cisco’s implementation of Radio Resource Management (RRM) in the Cisco Unified Wireless Network architecture.

Radio Resource Mangement

Radio Resource Mangement

In today’s wireless LAN infrastructures, of course users want more and more bandwidth in a greater and greater coverage area. This is tricky to implement, however, since adding more and more powerful access points can actually do more harm than good for throughput. The goal of Cisco’s Radio Resource Management is to act like a Radio Frequency engineer built-in to the equipment. RRM allows the Cisco Unified Wireless equipment to continuously monitor the Radio Frequency environment and adjust things like channel assignments and and power levels to ensure optimal coverage and throughput. The exciting goal here is to make the wireless infrastructure “self-healing”.

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Thanks to Randy of our CCNA program for this suggestion. Randy wanted some guidance on how to solve the subnetting questions in ICND1 and ICND2 very quickly. The ability to do this is often the difference between a passing score and a failed attempt.

WARNING: You must master subnetting using our course or some other trusted materials before you start using these shortcut approaches. It is a common issue for Cisco candidates to move directly to subnetting shortcuts for the exams without fully understanding exactly how subnetting functions.

For this series of posts, we will use simulated exam questions from ICND1 and ICND2. Well, with all that out of the way – let’s have some fun. You will find that once you “turn the corner” on subnetting, you will pray for many of these questions in the exam. It is an opportunity to solve questions quickly and be 100% convinced that your response is “spot on”.


Question 1: What is the last usable address in the subnet of a host with the address and the subnet mask of

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Encoding and Modulating

Questions Only

What form of CSMA does 802.11 use?

What does DCF stand for?

Your wireless station heres someone transmit and waits the duration heard plus what value?

What logically seperates WLANs?

Name three requirements to roam between two autonomous APS.

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