Posts Tagged ‘csr1000v’

Apr
18

Below are the steps needed to get the CSR1000v working in VMware Fusion on a Mac. Before we look at the steps here is the hardware and software I used:

CSR1000v

CSR1000v

Basically you need a quad core machine with a hypervisor (VMware, Virtual Box, KVM, etc). I just used VMware Fusion as it’s a commonly used hypervisor. Additionally I used two USB NICs to map to the GigabitEthernet1 and GigabitEthernet2 interfaces inside the CSR1000v. You could use any NICs or even subinterfaces if you are using Linux (Mac OS does support VLANs but I personally have not tried it with VMware Fusion). The GigabitEthernet0 is the management interface that is associated with the “Mgmt-intf” VRF so I didn’t want to use it for the internal and internet facing interfaces.
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Apr
15

Once you have ESXi 5.1 up and running download the CSR1000v OVA (Open Virtualization Archive) file here. Note that you will need to use your Cisco CCO login to download. Once the download is complete you need to open your vSphere Client and connect to your ESXi server. Once connected select the Deploy OVF Template option from the file menu.

CSR1000v Installation

Select the source of the OVA file you downloaded from your local machine.

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Apr
14

The Cloud Services Router, CSR1000v, which was first announced at Cisco Live in San Diego last year is now available for download. For those who have never heard of the CSR1000v, in a nutshell it’s an IOS XE image running in a virtualized environment (VMWare support now, Citrix XEN, Amazon, Windows Hypervisor and OpenStack in the near future). The CSR1000v is designed as a virtual router (think Quagga but IOS from Cisco) that resides on the hypervisor server as a client instance and provides any services a normal ASR1000 would provide between the other hypervisor’s client instances (Linux servers, Windows servers, etc) and the network infrastructure. This could be something as simple as basic routing or NAT all the way up to advanced technologies like MPLS VPNs or LISP. Basically anything that a real ASR1000 could provide you can do in the CSR1000v with a small exception. This early release only supports 50Mbps throughput due to licensing restrictions. This being the case the specifications from Cisco shows the CSR1000v being capable of pushing 1.17Gpbs max and 438Mbps throughput with an IMIX traffic flow. With the 50Mbps limit it means the CSR1000v at this stage would be deployed more for proof-of-concept as opposed to real production. At this time the throughput is limited by the licensing but I’m sure there are plans to allow for higher throughput licensing in the near future.

If you’re interested in a presentation from Cisco covering the CSR1000v you can view the Cisco Live session from London: Cisco‚Äôs Cloud Services Router (CSR 1000V): Extending the Enterprise Network to the Cloud (2013 London) Note that you will need to create an account if you don’t already have an account to view the session.

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