Posts Tagged ‘srr’

Jun
26

The goal of this article is to discuss how would the following configuration work in the 3560 series switches:

interface FastEthernet0/13
 switchport mode access
 load-interval 30
 speed 10
 srr-queue bandwidth shape 50 0 0 0
 srr-queue bandwidth share 33 33 33 1
 srr-queue bandwidth limit 20

Before we begin, let’s recap what we know so far about the 3560 egress queuing:

1) When SRR scheduler is configured in shared mode, bandwidth allocated to each queue is based on relative weight. E.g. when configuring “srr-queue bandwidth share 30 20 25 25″ we obtain the weight sum as 30+20+25+25 = 100 (could be different, but it’s nice to reference to “100”, as a representation of 100%). Relative weights are therefore “30/100”, “20/100”, “25/100”, “25/100” and you can calculate the effective bandwidth *guaranteed* to a queue multiplying this weight by the interface bandwidth: e.g. 30/100*100Mbps = 30Mbps for the 100Mbps interface and 30/100*10Mbps=3Mbps for 10Mbps interface. Of course, the weights are only taken in consideration when interface is oversubscribed, i.e. experiences a congestion.

2) When configured in shaped mode, bandwidth restriction (policing) for each queue is based on inverse absolute weight. E.g. for “srr-queue bandwidth shape 30 0 0 0” we effectively restrict the first queue to “1/30” of the interface bandwidth (which is approximately 3,3Mbps for 100Mbps interface and approximately 330Kbps for a 10Mbps interface). Setting SRR shape weight to zero effectively means no shaping is applied. When shaping is enabled for a queue, SRR scheduler does not use shared weight corresponding to this queue when calculating relative bandwidth for shared queues.

3) You can mix shaped and shared settings on the same interface. For example two queues may be configured for shaping and others for sharing:

interface FastEthernet0/13
 srr-queue bandwidth share 100 100 40 20
 srr-queue bandwidth shape  50  50  0  0

Suppose the interface rate is 100Mpbs; then queues 1 and 2 will get 2 Mbps, and queues 3 and 4 will share the remaining bandwidth (100-2-2=96Mbps) in proportion “2:1”. Note that queues 1 and 2 will be guaranteed and limited to 2Mbps at the same time.

4) The default “shape” and “share” weight settings are as follows: “25 0 0 0” and “25 25 25 25”. This means queue 1 is policed down to 4Mbps on 100Mpbs interfaces by default (400Kbps on 10Mbps interface) and the remaining bandwidth is equally shared among the other queues (2-4). So take care when you enable “mls qos” in a switch.

5) When you enable “priority-queue out” on an interface, it turns queue 1 into priority queue, and scheduler effectively does not account for the queue’s weight in calculations. Note that PQ will also ignore shaped mode settings as well, and this may make other queues starve.

6) You can apply “aggregate” egress rate-limitng to a port by using command “srr-queue bandwidth limit xx” at interface level. Effectively, this command limits interface sending rate down to xx% of interface capacity. Note that range starts from 10%, so if you need speeds lower than 10Mbps, consider changing port speed down o 10Mbps.

How will this setting affect SRR scheduling? Remember, that SRR shared weights are relative, and therefore they will share the new bandwidth among the respective queues. However, shaped queue rates are based on absolute weights calculated off interface bandwidth (e.g. 10Mbps or 100Mbps) and are subtracted from interface “available” bandwidth. Consider the example below:

interface FastEthernet0/13
 switchport mode access
 speed 10
 srr-queue bandwidth shape 50 0 0 0
 srr-queue bandwidth share 20 20 20 20
 srr-queue bandwidth limit 20

Interface sending rate is limited to 2Mbps. Queue 1 is shaped to 1/50 of 10Mps, which is 200Kbps of bandwidth. The remaining bandwidth 2000-200=1800Kbps is divided equally among other queues in proportion 20:20:20=1:1:1. That is, in case on congestion and all queues filled up, queue 1 will get 200Kbps, and queues 2-4 will get 600Kbps each.

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Mar
03

The 3560 QoS processing model is tightly coupled with it’s hardware architecture borrowed from the 3750 series switches. The most notable feature is the internal switch ring, which is used for the switch stacking purpose. Packets entering a 3560/3750 switch are queued and serviced twice: first on the ingress, before they are put on the internal ring, and second on the egress port, where they have been delivered by the internal ring switching. In short, the process looks as follows:

[Classify/Police/Mark] -> [Ingress Queues] -> [Internal Ring] -> [Egress Queues]

For more insights and detailed overview of StackWise technology used by the 3750 models, visit the following link:

Cisco StackWise Technology White Paper

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