Posts Tagged ‘vpls’

Oct
28

INE’s long awaited CCIE Service Provider Advanced Technologies Class is now available! But first, congratulations to Tedhi Achdiana who just passed the CCIE Service Provider Lab Exam! Here’s what Tedhi had to say about his preparation:

Finally i passed my CCIE Service Provider Lab exam in Hongkong on Oct, 17 2011. I used your CCIE Service Provider Printed Materials Bundle. This product makes me deep understand how the Service Provider technology works, so it doesn`t matter when Cisco has changed the SP Blueprint. You just need to practise with IOS XR and finding similiar command in IOS platform.

Thanks to INE and keep good working !

Tedhi Achdiana
CCIE#30949 – Service Provider

The CCIE Service Provider Advanced Technologies Class covers the newest CCIE SP Version 3.0 Blueprint, including the addition of IOS XR hardware. Class topics include Catalyst ME3400 switching, IS-IS, OSPF, BGP, MPLS Layer 3 VPNs (L3VPN), Inter-AS MPLS L3VPNs, IPv6 over MPLS with 6PE and 6VPE, AToM and VPLS based MPLS Layer 2 VPNs (L2VPN), MPLS Traffic Engineering, Service Provider Multicast, and Service Provider QoS. Understanding the topics covered in this class will ensure that students are ready to tackle the next step in their CCIE preparation, applying the technologies themselves with INE’s CCIE Service Provider Lab Workbook, and then finally taking and passing the CCIE Service Provider Lab Exam!

Streaming access is available for All Access Pass subscribers for as low as $65/month! Download access can be purchased here for $299. AAP members can additionally upgrade to the download version for $149.

Sample videos from class can be found after the break: Continue Reading

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Oct
18

One of our most anticipated products of the year – INE’s CCIE Service Provider v3.0 Advanced Technologies Class – is now complete!  The videos from class are in the final stages of post production and will be available for streaming and download access later this week.  Download access can be purchased here for $299.  Streaming access is available for All Access Pass subscribers for as low as $65/month!  AAP members can additionally upgrade to the download version for $149.

At roughly 40 hours, the CCIE SPv3 ATC covers the newly released CCIE Service Provider version 3 blueprint, which includes the addition of IOS XR hardware. This class includes both technology lectures and hands on configuration, verification, and troubleshooting on both regular IOS and IOS XR. Class topics include Catalyst ME3400 switching, IS-IS, OSPF, BGP, MPLS Layer 3 VPNs (L3VPN), Inter-AS MPLS L3VPNs, IPv6 over MPLS with 6PE and 6VPE, AToM and VPLS based MPLS Layer 2 VPNs (L2VPN), MPLS Traffic Engineering, Service Provider Multicast, and Service Provider QoS.

Below you can see a sample video from the class, which covers IS-IS Route Leaking, and its implementation on IOS XR with the Routing Policy Language (RPL)

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Nov
26

In our CCDP bootcamp, we examined Cisco’s implementation of Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS) in some detail. One blog that I promised our students was more information about how large enterprises or Internet Service Providers can enhance the scalbility of this solution.

First, let us review the issues that influence its scalability. We covered these in the course, but they are certainly worth repeating here.

Remember that VPLS looks just like an Ethernet switch to the customers. As such, this solution can suffer from the same issues that could hinder a Layer 2 core infrastructure. These are:

  • Control-plane scalability – classic VPLS calls for a full-mesh of pseudo-wires connecting the edge sites. This certainly does not scale as the number of edge sites grow – from both operational and control-plane viewpoints.
  • Network stability as the network grows – Spanning Tree Protocol-based (STP) infrastructures tend not to scale as well as Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) solutions.
  • Ability to recover from outages – as the VPLS network grows, it could become much more susceptible to major issues for customer connectivity in the result of a failure.
  • Multicast and broadcast radiation to all sites – remembering that the VPLS network acts as a Layer 2 switch reminds us that multicast and broadcast traffic can be flooded to all customers across the network.
  • Multicast scalability – multicast traffic has to be replicated on ingress PE devices, which significantly reduces forwarding efficiency.
  • IGP peering scalability issues – all routers attached to the cloud tend to be in the same broadcast domain and thus IGP peer, which results in full-mesh of adjacencies and excessive flooding when using link-state routing protocols.
  • STP loops – it is certainly possible that a customer creating an STP loop could impact other customers of the ISP. STP may be blocked across the MPLS cloud, but it is normally used for multi-homed deployments to prevent forwarding loops.
  • Load-balancing – the use of MPLS encapsulation hides the VPLS encapsulated flows from the core network and thus prevents the effective use of ECMP flow-based load-balancing.

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Feb
15

Introduction

Recently, there were discussions going around about Cisco’s new datacenter technology – Overlay Transport Virtualization (OTV), implemented in Nexus 7k data-center switches (limited demo deployments only). The purpose of this technology is connecting separated data-center islands over a convenient packet switched network. It is said that OTV is a better solution compared to well-known VPLS, or any other Layer 2 VPN technology. In this post we are going to give a brief comparison of two technologies and see what benefits OTV may actually bring to data-centers.

VPLS Overview

We are going to give a rather condensed overview of VPLS functionality here, just to have a baseline to compare OTV with. A reader is assumed to have solid understanding or MPLS and Layer 2 VPNs, as technology fundamentals are not described here.

otv-blog-post-vpls
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Feb
08

Overview

The purpose of this blog post is to give you a brief overview of M-LSPs, the motivation behind this technology and demonstrate some practical examples. We start with Multicast VPNs and then give an overview of the M-LSP implementations based on M-LDP and RSVP-TE extensions. The practical example is based on the recently added RSVP-TE signaling for establishing P2MP LSPs. All demostrations coud be replicated using the widely available Dynamips hardware emulator. The reader is assumed to have solid understanding of MPLS technologies, including LDP, RSVP-TE, MPLS/BGP VPNs and Multicast VPNs.

Multicast Domains Model

For years, the most popular solution for transporting multicast VPN traffic was using native IP multicast in SP core coupled with dynamic multipoint IP tunneling to isolate customer traffic. Every VPN would be allocated a separate MDT (Multicast Distribution Tree) or domain mapped to a core multicast group. Regular IP multicast routing is then used for forwarding, using PIM signaling in core. Notice, that the core network has to be multicast enabled in Multicast Domains model. This model is well mature by today and allows for effective and stable deployments even in Inter-AS scenarios. However, for the long time the question with MPVNs was – could we replace IP tunneling with MPLS label encapsulation? And the main motivation for moving to MPLS label switching would be leveraging MPLS traffic-engineering and protection features.

Tag Switched Multicast

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